#TogetherforScience

Let's stand #TogetherforScience

ICSE Campaign recognises the invaluable importance of cooperation to the field of science

We believe: Science and international cooperation are extremely important for all of us! In times of crisis, like the current Covid-19 pandemic, this holds true even more so than usual. 

We created this campaign to make benefits of basing decisions to global challenges in science and the benefits of cooperating in science and other disciplines visible. We want to show the world that isolationism, personal interests or gut feelings can never be a sustainable answer to issues that affect us all.

By reflecting on the importance of science and international cooperation together, we hope to encourage that we all stick together in order to move forward with thoughtful and well-reflected joint actions.

We asked a number of actors from different backgrounds to tell us why science and international cooperation matters to them. We hope that this is the beginning of an important conversation between us all.

Join the conversation and be a part of the movement

We are curious to hear what you think and would love for you to let us know. If you share our belief that international cooperation in science is invaluable, we would love to hear why that is and what it means to you. You can do this by sending us an e-mail using the key words #togetherforscience alongside a picture and your statement, completing one (or more) of the following sentences:

“Science is important to me, because….”

“International cooperation in science is important to me, because…”

You can also post your statement on social media (don’t forget to tag us @icse_freiburg). Join us in our effort to stick #TogetherforScience !

Science and international cooperation are important, because...

We asked international scientists, stakeholders and members of society to tell us why they think science and international cooperation matters. This what they said: 

“Science is important to me, because it is the most powerful tool to go beyond our limits and expand human knowledge and capacities. International cooperation in science enables us to combine multiple perspectives and experiences that lead to a final product which is much better than the sum of the isolated parts.”

Dr. Marta Romero Ariza, Associate Professor in Science EducationUnversity of Jaén, Spain

“International cooperation in science is important to me, because it expands the scope of my own ideas – more and contrasting ideas, sometimes from differing cultural contexts, help me think better. Science is important to me because it is by far the best way I know to converge on reliable understandings about important issues, subject those understandings to rigorous testing, and refine them.”

Alan Schoenfeld, Elizabeth and Edward Conner Professor of Education and Professor of MathematicsUniversity of California, Berkeley, USA

“Science has enabled me to think critically and appreciate the complexity of small things. International cooperation in science has the power to broaden our horizon, to foster understanding across nations and it enables us to solve global problems together.”

Annette Lykknes, Professor at the Department of Teacher EducationNorwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

“Science plays a major role in tackling global challenges and taking reflected decisions. International cooperation in science helps to deepen the necessary knowledge, to jointly analyse complex situations and to learn from each other.”

Dr. Katja Maass, Professor in Mathematics EducationUniversity of Education Freiburg, Germany

“International cooperation in science is important to me, because working together we can respond better to current and future challenges we come across.”

Chrissavgi Triantafillou, Lecturer in Mathematics EducationNational and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

“International cooperation in science is important to me, because it is our responsibility to make science accessible and useful for everybody.”

Dr. Michiel Doorman, Associate Professor in Mathematics EducationUtrecht University, Netherlands

“Science is important to me because it can contribute to the improvement of the quality of the life in the world.”

Dr. Despina Potari, Professor in Mathematics EducationNational and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

“Science is important to me, because I like reasoning and understanding the world we live in. International cooperation in science helps me to make connection with researchers and to challenge new ideas.”

Dr. Valentina Dagienė, Professor of InformaticsVilnius University, Lithuania

“International cooperation in science is important to me, because together we can do so much more! Moreover, cultural differences add perspectives and by that we understand things better.”

Dr. Jesper Boesen, Associate Professor in Mathematics EducationJönköping University, Sweden

“Science is important to me because it answers questions and provides solutions but also leads to asking more questions.”

Dr. Josette Farrugia, Senior Lecturer in Science EducationUniversity of Malta, Malta

“Science is important to me, because it shows us both: our possibilities and our limitations.”

Dr. Stefan Zehetmeier, Associate Professor in Mathematics EducationKlagenfurt University, Austria

“Cooperation in science is important to me, because bringing together different perspectives is beneficial to all.”

Giorgos Psycharis, Lecturer in Mathematics EducationThe National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece

“Different cultures determine different ideas and approach. Diversity makes science possible!”

Dr. Teresita Gravina, STEM teacherScientix & Europeanaeu ambassador and ANISN national board member, Italy

“Science is important to me, because it makes me doubt what others are uncritically calling for. Through international cooperation in science I can share my doubts with colleagues from different countries and continents.”

Dr. Martin Bílek, Professor in Chemistry EducationCharles University in Prague, Czech Republic

“Cooperation in science is important to me, because bringing together different perspectives is beneficial to all.”

Alice Hesse, PhD CandidateIPN, Kiel University, Germany

“Science matters to me, because it is a school of thoughts on the top of knowledge level. International cooperation in science matters to me, because it is about sharing attitudes, discussing questions, making common understanding, implementing new ideas and activities and provoking to reach new and high professional and personal horizons.”

Sona Ceretkova, Associate Professor of MathematicsConstantine the Phisopher University in Nitra, Slovakia

“International cooperation in science is important to me, because unlike Cold War rivalry when researchers from the opposite sides “were digging parallel tunnels instead of building a Simplon-like tunnel”, todays synergistic relations within research teams are driven by common goals for human prosperity in an atmosphere, embracing various cultures, traditions and backgrounds with appreciation.”

Jenny Sendova, Senior Researcher at Institute of Mathematics and InformaticsBulgarian Academy of Science, Bulgaria

“Science is important to me, because it provides glasses through which I can try to discern the world. International cooperation in science is important to me, because cooperation – past and present – has provided the shoulders for me to stand on.”

Camilla Berge Vik, Associate ProfessorNorwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway

“Science is important to me, because it opens our mind.”

Prof. Mag. Dr. Konrad KrainerUniversity of Klagenfurt, Austria

“Science matters to me because it helps improve our everyday lives and explains the world around us.”

Dr. Maria Evagorou, Assistant Professor in Science EducationUniversity of Nicosia, Cyprus

“International cooperation in science matters to me because it opens a new dimension of thinking. Science matters to me, because it brings unlimited possibilities of discovering.”

PhD Imrich Jakab, Department of Ecology and Environmental Research, Faculty of Natural SciencesConstantine the Philosopher University in Nitra, Slovakia

What does cooperation and science mean to you?

Send us your Statement alongside a picture of you or post it directly on social media, using #togetherforscience!

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